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FATE’S SHADOW: THE WHOLE STORY

FATE’S SHADOW: THE WHOLE STORY

Screenshot 2024-03-08 135316

Review by FilmmakerLife

Magnificently written and directed by Michelle Arthur, FATE’S SHADOW: THE WHOLE STORY is a romantic epic drama that stars Michelle Arthur, Kevin Caliber, Patrick Stalinski, Kathleen Randazzo and others.

Michelle Arthur plays Eva, who is in a love and hate abusive relationship with her boyfriend Zack. A chance encounter will see Eva discovering her multiple past lives. As she discovers her bond with her lover across multiple decades all the way back to 1840, Eva will finally figure out how to turn the tables on her abusive relationship. Will she emancipate herself or will her messing with time lead to unexpected problems?

The acting by this stellar cast, particularly Michelle Arthur, is superb. Michelle as Eva dives into the role of her life with ease and manages to steal the entire film. She is energetic, funny, and poignant. Her sheer range of emotions is highly impressive as well. Going toe to toe with her is Kevin Caliber as Zack and together, the two elevate the film entirely. The rest of the cast manages to deliver their very best as well, helping to aggrandize the writing through their nuanced performances.

Speaking of the script, Michelle infuses a sense of wonder and originality whilst showcasing the abuse women have suffered throughout the years in the supposed name of love. Throughout the last two centuries, love and courtship were very different as compared to today. Much was accepted that would absolutely be frowned upon in modern day. This is thus a very feminist film without being explicitly overt about it. Equally impressive is the direction that balances the visual and emotional elements of the story quite well. Michelle keeps the pacing on track, ensuring that even those slow moments do not mess with the overall narrative heft. With a lot of ground to cover in around 90 minutes, the film editing by Jeff Vernon keeps the feature sharp and concise. That enables the director to tell the story she wants to tell exactly the way she wants to.

In the technical department, the film is absolutely gorgeous to view. Expertly utilising the light at sunrise and sunset in those precious moments, the visual aspects of the production soar beyond our wildest expectations. Efficient use of lighting also ensures all other aspects of the production receive a glow up as well. Equally impressive is the originally composed music and sound design by R. Kim Shultz that transports the audience into different decades and centuries effortlessly.

Thus, Fate’s Shadow: The Whole Story does its subject matter justice. Juggling the complexities of a romantic period piece with time travel is no easy task but Michelle Arthur achieves that. From terrific acting to spot on direction in many locations and from the brilliant score to creative cinematography, every aspect of the production is top-notch resulting in a film that will enthrall and impress audiences the world over.  For more information, click:  https://www.imdb.com/title/tt9163782/

Cast / Crew

Director(s):
Michelle Arthur
Writer(s):
Michelle Arthur
Editor(s):
Jeff Vernon, Peppa Clurman, Michael Schulte
Cast:
Michelle Arthur, Kevin Caliber, Patrick Stalinski, Kathleen Randazzo, Maria Bobeva, Jeff Vernon, Karen Sharpe, Kat Kramer, Sherwin Ace Ross, Roosevelt Palafox, Linney Allen, Armando DuBon Jr., Silviya Belcheva, Stacy Newton, Michelle G. Stratton, Maksim Leonov, Elena Nesterova, Surinder Bamrah, Gopal Nunemacher, Dan Kennedy, Pamela Francesca Rubino, Justice Joslin, Edythe Davis, Oliver Stafford
Director of Photography :
Anup Kulkarni, Cinematographers Alex Pollini, Diego Ferres Devotto, Craig Purdum, and Deep Sawant
Producer(s):
Executive Producer/Producer Michelle Arthur, Executive Producer Surinder Bamrah, Associate Producer Maureen Mahon, Associate Producer Todd Tetreault, Senior Associate Producer Jeff Vernon
Sound:
Sound Editor/Designer R. Kim Shultz, Sound Recordists Blake Christian, Craig Purdum, Rudy J. Garcia, and Christopher Robleto-Harvey
Music:
R. Kim Shultz

Specifications

Genre:
Drama Romance
Country:
USA
Year:
2021
Language:
English, Bulgarian, French, Spanish

About the Director

Michelle Renee Arthur, originally from Indianapolis, Indiana, boasts a diverse heritage including English, Irish, Scottish, German, and Cherokee roots. Showing a passion for acting since the age of 6, she excelled in various roles throughout high school, from gymnast to newspaper editor. Inspired by her uncle, a former LA Times columnist, she pursued a Bachelor of Arts degree from Indiana University's School of Journalism, with additional studies at UCLA and various acting studios. Following an internship with Conde Nast Publication's Brides, Michelle embarked on a successful media career, contributing to publications like The New Yorker, Cosmopolitan, and Robb Report. Transitioning to acting, she made appearances in TV shows and films before returning to Los Angeles in 2014 to pursue her passion full-time. Since then, she has taken on lead and supporting roles in numerous acclaimed productions, showcasing her talent both in front of and behind the camera, including writing and producing her own script registered with the WGAW.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Photo Gallery / Video

Synopsis

A rich player emotionally abuses his girlfriend until she discovers the bond of multiple past lives that ties them into present day and turns the tables.
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“Juggling the complexities of a romantic period piece with time travel is no easy task but Michelle Arthur achieves that”

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